3 in 5 Americans surveyed say driving feels less safe because of pandemic

The pandemic has increased road anxiety overall, with 65 percent of Americans claiming they feel more anxious in cars than before the pandemic, according to new research.

A survey of 2,000 adults looked at how people are becoming more careful on the road and found that more than half of drivers “always” or “often” feel concerned about other drivers’ behavior (53 percent).

Three in 5 agree that the pandemic has forced people to drive more unsafely (61 percent), which is why a similar percentage say it’s more safe to drive now than ever before (62 percent) is more important.

Similarly, 60 percent keep an eye on the speedometer when someone else is driving.

The pandemic has increased road anxiety overall, with 65 percent of Americans claiming they feel more anxious in cars now than before the pandemic, according to new research.
Josh Castronuvo/Zanger

Most of those in relationships also admitted that they panic when their partner is driving (63 percent).

Half of the respondents shared that when they’re a passenger, they often find themselves wishing the driver slowed down (52 percent), and 7 out of 10 made sure to check that everyone had their seat belts on before the car started. Is.

The survey, conducted by OnePoll in partnership with Cobra, a maker of automotive and consumer electronics, found that the average American has made three close calls in the past two years.

But that’s not deterring the 53 percent of respondents who plan to take more road trips this summer than in 2019.

In general, about 1 in 3 drivers said they find themselves driving more in the summer than in any other season (31 percent), with 65 percent admitting they take both short and long road trips. But drive faster than usual.

During these trips, it is common for half the respondents to worry about what hazards lie on the road ahead, such as delays or accidents.

People find themselves driving too fast when they run late (38 percent), fewer cars on the road (36 percent) or when they’re in a hurry (34 percent).

And more than a third of US drivers disclosed that they only “sometimes,” “rarely” or “never” comply with speed limits on a road or highway (35 percent).

“Like every other aspect of our everyday lives, driving has changed a lot in the past two years,” said Gail Babbitt, CEO of Cedar Electronics (Cobra Electronics’ parent company). “From the seemingly empty roads at the start of the pandemic to the current ‘revenge journey’ wave we are seeing this summer, it is important for today’s drivers to feel safe and confident when behind the wheel.”

Traffic Lights In Chicago
The survey reported that people find themselves driving too fast when driving late (38 percent), fewer cars on the road (36 percent) or in a hurry (34 percent). Image: A traffic light controls the flow of vehicles and pedestrians near the city of Chicago, Illinois, on April 20, 2005.
Scott Olson / Getty Images

Lack of vehicle preparedness is the biggest challenge when driving long distances, followed closely by weather hazard or vehicle/mechanical trouble (34 percent, each).

More than a quarter of respondents would be willing to sacrifice a day of their weekend if it meant they could ensure a smoother journey (28 percent).

Half of the respondents said they would not know what to do if their vehicle broke down on the highway (53 percent), and nearly a quarter did not believe in knowing what to do if their vehicle’s battery was in the middle. What should be done if she dies? One visit (23 percent).

This is why a third of the respondents considered investing in a tire inflator, while 30 percent would pay good money for a car battery charger that could come in handy.

Similarly, a quarter of respondents are interested in purchasing a dash cam to help make their travel safer.

“Whether it’s a dash cam to give a driver a second pair of eyes on the road – or a jump starter for those ‘just in case’ moments, it’s important for drivers to invest in tools that make travel easier and safer.” Feelings can help,” Babbitt said.

What would people sacrifice for a smooth road trip?

  • Favorite Dress – 29 percent
  • One day of their weekend – 28 percent
  • Streaming service – 28 percent
  • More hours on the road – 27 percent
  • a full night’s sleep – 27 percent

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