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After the oil spill, every affected coast of Southern California reopens using its own standards.

According to official documents, there are no uniform guidelines for deciding when it is safe to return to the waters affected by the 131,000 gallon oil spill in Orange County, with each municipality deciding for itself when to return to the coast. To open

The state and city beaches of Huntington Beach reopened Monday morning under a state-city agreement, but without the involvement of the Orange County Healthcare Agency. County Health is not expected to complete its initial testing by mid-week.

Newport Beach reopened its shores Monday afternoon and said on its website, “Water quality tests show seawater is safe for swimmers and surfers to return to.”

Meanwhile, the city of Laguna Beach is examining itself but will work with the county to determine when to proceed.

Despite having a “unified command” to coordinate spill operations, the jurisdiction “you” decides when to reopen the water.

No consultant or county provides a set standard for reopening. That means it’s up to your municipality, “Caterer wrote.

Ketter wrote that many municipalities have contracted for their own testing to find out when water is safe for humans.

Huntington Beach state and city beaches closed at the end of October 2 after oil spills off the coast of Newport Beach and Huntington Beach.

  • Cousins ‚Äč‚ÄčAnna and Valerie Beginas, left, laugh as they descend into the water on Monday, October 11, 2021 in Huntington Beach, CA. The couple was traveling from Arizona. The coast of Orange County was reopened after an oil spill, but authorities allowed access to the water from Monday. (Photo by Paul Bersibach, Orange County Register / SCNG)

  • A lone motorcyclist reopened the beach at Huntington Beach on Monday, October 11, 2021 after an oil spill. (Photo by Leonard Ortiz, Orange County Register / SCNG)

  • Cleaning crews were searching for oil near the pier at Huntington Beach, CA on Monday, October 11, 2021, when visitors returned to shore. The coast was reopened after an oil spill off the coast of Orange County, but authorities allowed access to the water from Monday. (Photo by Paul Bersibach, Orange County Register / SCNG)

  • Cleaning crews were searching for oil near the pier at Huntington Beach, CA on Monday, October 11, 2021, when visitors returned to shore. The coast was reopened after an oil spill off the coast of Orange County, but authorities allowed access to the water from Monday. (Photo by Paul Bersibach, Orange County Register / SCNG)

  • Laguna Beach workers continue cleaning the beach on Monday, October 11, 2021, following the recent oil spill off Huntington Beach. (Photo of Mandi Shower, Orange County Register / SCNG)

  • Cleaning crews were searching for oil near the pier at Huntington Beach, CA on Monday, October 11, 2021, when visitors returned to shore. The coast was reopened after an oil spill off the coast of Orange County, but authorities allowed access to the water from Monday. (Photo by Paul Bersibach, Orange County Register / SCNG)

  • Cleaning crews were searching for oil near the pier at Huntington Beach, CA on Monday, October 11, 2021, when visitors returned to shore. The coast was reopened after an oil spill off the coast of Orange County, but authorities allowed access to the water from Monday. (Photo by Paul Bersibach, Orange County Register / SCNG)

  • Although Huntington State Beach has reopened after the oil spill, only birds have settled on Huntington Beach on October 11, 2021.

Huntington Beach and the State Department of Fish and Wildlife signed an agreement with Moft & Nicole Engineering Company to test the water, which began Friday.

Huntington Beach spokeswoman Jennifer Kerry said the water samples collected on Friday, October 8, did not show unhealthy levels of petroleum-related toxins.

“They test for PAHs (polycyclic aromatic hyddrocarbons) and TPHs (total petroleum hydrocarbons),” Kerry said. “Only one site returned identifiable quantities of any type of oil chemical.”

Kerry said Huntington Beach was able to reopen faster than expected, partly because of the weather.

“The current cut off the flow of oil,” he said.

In addition, he said: “There was less oil than we thought before. Estimates of the outbreak have dropped significantly, which is great news.

Huntington Beach Mayor Kim Carr said the city would not move forward with reopening its coast without knowing it was safe to do so, and it would post all of its water testing data on a new City Spill Information website. Is sharing

“We want people to feel comfortable,” he said. “We want them to be safe.”

Newport Beach said on its website that it tested 10 locations and “the test showed no identifiable levels of PAH or petroleum hydrocarbons in eight of the 10 locations. Some of the remaining oil fell in two locations.” , Found on non-toxic surfaces, veg and balboh pier.

More beaches, and in some cases beaches and waters, have reopened since the outbreak, but it is not entirely clear which agencies are involved in these decisions.

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