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While conditions on the orange line have improved, passengers on the red line have experienced increasing delays in recent months.

Delays on the Orange Line MBTA are now the shortest since 2019, according to data from public transport group TransitMatters.

Good news for Orange Line passengers: Delays on the line are now the shortest since 2019, according to data from the public transport advocacy group TransitMatters.

The total delay due to slow zones has fallen to 0.28 minutes – slightly less than 17 seconds – and has been steady since last Thursday, according to TransitMatters data. Delays peaked at nearly 27 minutes when the Orange Line first came back online in September after a 30-day shutdown for much-needed repairs.

Median since Monday travel time the drive from Oak Grove to Forest Hills was just over 36 minutes.

“Based on our data, this is almost the fastest result ever,” said Seth Kaplan, software engineer and volunteer lab team TransitMatters Boston Globe. “It’s promising.”

Background

TransitMatters has used data collected since 2016 to calculate the average time it takes to get from one station to another, comparing that average to current travel times to calculate delays, Kaplan said. Globe.

Orange Line saw continued delays after a 30-day closure, with frustrated passengers reporting that the service was worse than ever.

During a Senate MBTA safety hearing last month, Senator Ed Markey pressured MBTA CEO Steve Poftak to reveal average travel time figures as well as a list of work to be done before the orange line would run at full speed.

In his response, Poftak said the transit agency had made progress in lifting speed limits, with most of the remaining restrictions expected to be lifted in November and December.

What’s the deal with the Red Line?

The MBTA continues to struggle with the entire system service changes, some related to staff shortages. While conditions on the Orange Line have improved, Red Line passengers have seen increasing delays in recent months, exceeding 18 minutes on Monday.

Red Line passengers have endured a lot, TransitMatters wrote in October blog post“But recently, anyone who has driven the tracks between Alewife and Ashmont or Braintree has almost certainly noticed that their driving is also a bit slower than it should be.”

“It’s terrifying,” said Kaplan Globe. “We crush one worm, and in the meantime another one appears.”

MBTA spokeswoman Lisa Battiston told Boston.com in an email that T maintenance crews “worked weekends and nights this fall to address areas of the Red Line where speed limits were in place (following regular scheduled track inspections).”

Crews recently carried out maintenance on the railroad between Savin Hill and Fields Corner and near Harvard Station between Porter and Davis stations, she said.

“The railroad tracks have been replaced in these sections, but the new track needs to be given sufficient time to stabilize before the trains can be increased in speed,” continued Battiston. She added that crews are still doing the work, including at the Braintree branch this past weekend.

“The MBTA appreciates the patience of its riders as employees make these important safety improvements,” she said.

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#Data #shows #Orange #Line #delays #shortest

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