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Did you see the Northern Lights last night? Lucky star Geezer shares great photos of Aurora.

Did you see the Northern Lights last night? Lucky Star Geysers shared stunning photos of Aurora from the UK, US and Canada when a major solar storm hit Earth.

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Lucky Star Geysers shared great photos of the Northern Lights in the skies over the UK, US and Canada last night on social media.  Photo: Photographer Jenin Holovatiuk posted this shot of the Northern Lights in Saskatchewan, Canada last night.

Lucky Star Geysers shared great photos of the Northern Lights in the skies over the UK, US and Canada last night on social media. Photo: Photographer Jenin Holovatiuk posted this shot of the Northern Lights in Saskatchewan, Canada last night.

Last night's lights were visible as far as New York in the United States, and in Scotland, Northern Ireland, and parts of northern England in the United Kingdom.  Photo: Aurora Above Mine, USA.

Last night’s lights were visible in the United States as far as New York, and in Scotland, Northern Ireland and parts of Northern England in the United Kingdom. Photo: Aurora Above Mine, USA.

Humans have observed the Northern Lights for thousands of years: In ancient Chinese folklore, a young woman who saw the lights gave birth to the legendary father of all Chinese people, Emperor Xuanyuan.  Photo: Northern Lights in the sky over Edinburgh last night.

Humans have observed the Northern Lights for thousands of years: In ancient Chinese folklore, a young woman who saw the lights gave birth to Emperor Xuanyuan, the legendary father of all Chinese people. Photo: Northern Lights in the sky over Edinburgh last night.

Green and pink light shows usually occur when electrically charged particles from the sun emit gases into the Earth's atmosphere, causing them to glow.  Photo: Northern Lights as seen last night at Corman Park No. 344 in Saskatchewan, Canada.

Green and pink light shows usually occur when electrically charged particles from the sun emit gases into the Earth’s atmosphere, causing them to glow. Photo: Northern Lights as seen last night at Corman Park No. 344 in Saskatchewan, Canada.

The ripples that Aureura believes are similar to a veil of light and reflect the lines of force in the Earth's geographic field with which the solar particles travel.  Photo: Northern Lights as seen in the sky over Palmas County in Manitoba, Canada last night.

The ripples that Aureura believes are similar to a veil of light and reflect the lines of force in the Earth’s geographic field with which the solar particles travel. Photo: Northern Lights as seen in the sky over Palmas County in Manitoba, Canada last night.

Twitter user ibsmeetsworld wrote, 'I got to see #NordernLights last night and I'll never get over it.'

Twitter user ibsmeetsworld wrote, ‘I got to see #NordernLights last night and I’ll never get over it.’

Normally, Aurora is only visible at high latitudes, around the Earth's magnetic poles, but yesterday's major solar storm extended their range.  Photo: Northern Horse above the tree line in White Horse, Yukon, northern Canada.

Normally, Aurora is only visible at high latitudes, around the Earth’s magnetic poles, but yesterday’s major solar storm extended their range. Photo: Northern Horse above the tree line in White Horse, Yukon, northern Canada.

The breathtaking display made an impression last night.  Twitter user Jesse Vaughn said: 'Please forgive me when I cry for the next 6 years, I saw the Northern Lights in Scotland.'

The breathtaking display made an impression last night. Twitter user Jesse Vaughn said: ‘Please forgive me when I cry for the next 6 years, I saw the Northern Lights in Scotland.’

Jeanine Holovatic, self-made aurora chaser of Northern Escape Photography, tweeted,  Photo: Northern Lights as seen from Sambraghead, on Scottish mainland.

Jeanine Holovatic, self-made Aurora Chaser of NorthernScape Photography, tweeted, Photo: Northern Lights as seen from Sambraghead, on Scottish mainland.

Yesterday's solar storm, predicted by both the UK Met Office and the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, was slower than expected to reach Earth.  Photo: Northern Lights above a tree line in White Horse, Yukon, in northwestern Canada.

Yesterday’s solar storm, predicted by both the UK Met Office and the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, was slower than expected to reach Earth. Photo: White Horse in northwestern Canada, Northern Lights above the tree line in Yukon.

The organizations originally said that Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) - a massive emission of plasma from the outer layer of the sun - would reach Earth by 5 pm BST (12pm EST) tomorrow.  Photo: Northern Lights over Scotland last night.

The organizations originally said that Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) – a massive emission of plasma from the outer layer of the sun – would reach Earth by 5 pm BST (12pm EST) tomorrow. Photo: Northern Lights over Scotland last night.

The space weather event, which began back on October 9, was driven by less-sunny solar winds than predicted, and arrived “fashionably late” in the words of physicist Timothy Skov. Photo: Northern Lights over Scotland last night.

The Met Office said: “Small hurricanes may continue until October 12, before the coronal hole winds up, perhaps for active periods rather than geomagnetic activity.” Photo: Aurora over Scotland last night, captured by Twitter user ess Jesse Van.

A Norwegian account of 1230 AD attributes the Northern Lights to a sea fire, while Benjamin Franklin proposed in 1778 the theory that an aurora accelerates electrical charges on poles due to snow and ice.  Photo: The Northern Lights from Sambraghead on Scottish mainland Shetland.

A Norwegian account of 1230 AD attributes the Northern Lights to a sea fire, while Benjamin Franklin theorized in 1778 that an aurora accelerates electrical charges on poles due to snow and ice. Photo: The Northern Lights from Sambraghead on Scottish mainland Shetland.

Some Native Americans believed that the light in the sky was the soul of their dead - and during the Battle of Gatesburg, Confederate soldiers, seeing its effect, assumed its presence in the South and assumed that God was on their side. ۔  Photo: Northern Lights over Alaska last night.

Some Native Americans believed that the light in the sky was the soul of their dead – and during the Battle of Gatesburg, Confederate soldiers, seeing its effect, assumed its presence in the South and assumed that God was on their side. ۔ Photo: Northern Lights over Alaska last night.

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