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Facebook introduces new controls for children using its platform

New York – Facebook, After countless testimonies that its platforms harm children, will introduce a number of features, including gestures for teens to take a break using their photo-sharing app Instagram, and teens to watch the same content over and over again. Which is not conducive. For their welfare

Based in Menlo Park, California. Facebook It also plans to introduce new controls for teens on an optional basis so that parents or guardians can monitor what their teens are doing online. These steps come later. Facebook It was announced late last month that he was stopping work on his Instagram for Kids project. But critics say the plan lacks details and doubts the new features will work.

The new controls were announced on Sunday. Nick Clegg, FacebookThe vice president for global affairs, who has appeared on various Sunday news shows, including CNN’s “State of the Union” and ABC’s “George Stefanopoulos” this week, talked about him. Gone FacebookAlong with the use of algorithms, its role in spreading harmful misinformation before the January 6 capital riots.

“We are constantly striving to improve our products.” Clegg Dana told Bash on “State of the Union” on Sunday. “We can’t make everyone’s life perfect with the wave of the stick. All we can do is improve our products, so that our products are safe and enjoyable to use.

Clegg said that Facebook Over the past few years, 40,000 people in the company have invested 13 13 billion to secure the platform and work on these issues. And while. Clegg said that Facebook Every effort is made to keep harmful content away from our platform. They They say They Was open to further regulation and supervision.

“We need more transparency.” They Told CNN’s Bush. They Note that the system which Facebook If necessary, it should be accounted for by regulation so that “people can match what our system says.

A flurry of interviews followed with Whale Crystal Francis Hogan, a former data scientist. FacebookLast week, Congress was accused of failing to make changes to Instagram on social media platforms when an internal investigation clearly harmed some teenagers and showed dishonesty in its public fight against hatred and misinformation. Hagen’s allegations were corroborated by thousands of pages of internal investigative documents he had secretly copied before leaving the company’s civil integrity unit.

Josh Golan, executive director of Fairplay, which oversees the children’s and media marketing industry, said he did not think it would be effective to introduce controls to help parents monitor teens, as many teens set up secret accounts somehow. He was also skeptical about how effective it would be for young people to take a break or stay away from harmful substances. He noted. Facebook It needs to demonstrate how they will implement it and present research that shows that these tools are effective.

“There is a lot of skepticism,” he said, adding that regulators need to limit what they do. Facebook Does with its algorithm.

He said that he also believes in this. Facebook Her Instagram project for children should be canceled.

When Clegg In separate interviews, both Bush and Stefanopoulos inquired about the use of algorithms to spread misinformation before the January 6 riots, to which he replied that if Facebook The algorithm has been removed which people will see more, no less hate speech, and more, no less, misinformation.

Clegg Both told the hosts that the algorithms act as “big spam filters”.

Democrat Sen. Amy Klubacher, who chairs the Senate Commerce Committee on Competitive Policy, No Confidence, and Consumer Rights, told Bush in a separate interview Sunday that it’s time to update child privacy laws. And the use of algorithms should be made more transparent.

“I appreciate that he’s willing to talk about things, but I’m sure it’s time to talk,” Klobuchter said. Clegg“Now is the time for action.”

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