former representative. Max Rose Meets With Gov. Kathy Hochul To Fix NY’s Bail Laws

Democratic congressional candidate Max Rose is urging Gov. Kathy Hochul and the state legislature to hold an emergency session to toughen New York’s controversial no-cash bail law.

Rose’s appeal comes after similar arguments made last week by Mayor Eric Adams and GOP lawmakers, including Republican nominee for governor, Rep. Lee Zeldin.

“Mayor Adams is right about this. We need more Democrats to come out and say the bail law needs to be fixed. It has to happen,” Rose told The Post in an interview on Sunday.

Rose, a moderate Democrat running for her old congressional seat in Staten Island and southern Brooklyn, is expected to win the August 23 primary against socialist candidate Brittany Ramos Debaros.

If he does, the former legislator will face a rematch against Republican incumbent Representative Nicole Maliotakis in the 11th congressional district general election.

David Jacobonis of Fairport, NY, leaves after being remanded by federal law enforcement after a bail hearing.
Stephen Yang

Malliotakis defeated Rose in a tough fight in 2020, and she’s likely going to try to portray him as part of the soft-of-crime Democrats leading New York.

However, Rose said that he has consistently sought changes to the bail law soon after it was approved in 2019.

“It’s too simple. The government Hochul and the legislature need a special session to change the bail law, including applying a ‘dangerous standard.’ Fix it,” he said.

Max Rose
Rose’s appeal comes after similar arguments were made last week by Mayor Eric Adams and GOP lawmakers, including Rep. Lee Zeldin.
Steve White

Rose said that fellow Democrats — such as Hochul, Assembly Speaker Carl Hesty (D-Bronx) and Senate Majority Leader Andrea Stewart-Cousins ​​(D-Yonkers) — should be able to “walk and chew gum at the same time.” Recently noted. Approved legislation to tighten gun restrictions in public areas in response to a US Supreme Court ruling in June.

Amid a storm of criticism, lawmakers twice amended criminal justice reform legislation that eliminated cash bail for several nonviolent offenses – in 2020 and earlier this year.

But critics say these changes were not enough to deter serial offenders from committing more crimes during free trial or resolution of their cases.

Kathy Hochulu
Democratic congressional candidate Max Rose is urging Gov. Kathy Hochul and the state legislature to hold an emergency session to toughen New York’s controversial no-cash bail law.
GNMiller/NYPost

The law was intended to prevent low-income criminal defendants from being detained simply because they were too poor to post cash bail. Rose agrees to the premise of the law.

Echoing Adams, Zeldin and other critics, he said, “The problem is we went to the other extreme.” “There’s no reason why we can’t have both public safety and fairness.”

Then-government Andrew Cuomo and lawmakers revised the bail law in April 2020, adding a number of new offenses to be re-eligible for bail – including second-degree theft, promoting child pornography and vehicular trafficking. Murders, which are mostly related to drunk driving.

Max Rose
Rose, a moderate Democrat, is running for his old congressional seat in Staten Island and southern Brooklyn.
Paul Martinka

In a settlement as part of the state budget, Hochul and lawmakers revamped the law to make additional offenses eligible for bail and give judges more discretion in granting bail, including many open cases to defendants. , who have a history of using guns. and for those who have previously been charged or convicted of causing grievous harm, or of violating an order of protection.

But lawmakers refused to offer a “dangerous” standard for considering bail. New York law has prohibited judges from using defendants’ “dangerousness” as a standard in setting bail since 1971, but some, including Adams, have said they support changing that rule.

Hochul and MLA leaders said they have no appetite to revisit the bail law again this year.

The governor said last week that there had been “no discussion” on whether to call lawmakers back to Albany for a special session.

Hochul said, “What I want to point out is that significant changes were made to the bail laws – reforming the bailiffs – because I believe we have to do everything in our power to protect public safety. ” Approving the changes requires “consensus” among lawmakers.

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