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The drone delivers the lungs to the transplant recipient, a medical first.

A scene of an aerial drone carrying its transport container.

A scene of an aerial drone carrying its transport container.
Image: Neither Bioélectronique.

It only took six minutes, but a successful flight from Toronto Western Hospital to Toronto General Hospital demonstrated the usefulness of using drones to transport lung transplants quickly and safely.

Engineer Elaine Hodak, 63, is the first person in history to receive a pair of lungs from a delivery drone. The shipment took place in Toronto on September 25, according to the Canadian Press. The drone landed on the roof of Toronto General Hospital at 1 a.m. local time. Reports Via CBC

Surgeon-in-Chief of the Canadian University Health Network and Professor Shaf Keshwaji of the University of Toronto were there to receive and inspect the valuable package.

Surgeon Shaf Keshuji with his most valuable equipment.

Surgeon Shaf Keshuji with his most valuable equipment.
Image: شاف کیشواجی۔

“It was a very interesting moment to see him come down to tall buildings,” he said. told Reporters “I definitely breathed a sigh of relief when it landed and I was able to … everything was fine.”

That everything was fine, there was no accident. The drone flight from Toronto Western Hospital took only six minutes, but it took 18 months to plan and prepare to pull it off. Unither Bioélectronique engineers had to make it light. The shipping container is capable of withstanding vibrations and sudden changes in altitude and air pressure along with other environmental pressures. The team practiced with dummy packages, conducted drop tests, and fitted carbon fiber containers with emergency parachutes and GPS systems.

Drones during the test, with CN Tower in the background.

Drones during the test, with CN Tower in the background.
Image: Neither Bioélectronique.

Drones have previously transported transplanted organs, including the kidneys, cornea and pancreas, but the lungs posed an additional challenge. As a Canadian press. According to the report, about 80% of the donated lungs cannot be used due to inadequate oxygenation or at least not meeting functional standards. And like any transplanted organ, time is of the essence. The sooner an organ is brought to the patient, the better. So the desire to send limbs by air instead of crowded city traffic.

Martin Ruth Bullet, CEO of United Therapeutics, a parent company of Unither Bioélectronique based in Quebec, chose Toronto General Hospital because it was the first hospital to perform lung transplants (1983) and double lung transplants (1986). ۔ The founder of Ceres XM Satellite Radio, a millionaire, said he “felt that the grace of the universe would be right if for the first time A drone transplant was also performed at Toronto General Hospital.

A drone lands on the roof of Toronto General Hospital.

A drone lands on the roof of Toronto General Hospital.
Image: Neither Bioélectronique.

With this first successful delivery, United Therapeutics can look forward to bigger and bolder feats. The company would like. Extend the range Suitable drones And build units capable of flying 100 miles (160 kilometers) and then 200 miles (320 kilometers). Ultimately, United Therapy will seek to reach the lungs, hearts and kidneys throughout North America. Other companies operating in the area include US companies AD Airlines and AlarisPro Transport and China’s EHang.

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