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Tick ​​tock challenges, weapons on campus, CHISD chiefs talking about campus security.

Cedar Hill High School.

Chief James Hawthorne Cedar Hill protects the ISD.

As news of the shooting at Timber View High School in Mainfield surfaced last week, another school just 12 miles away also came under fire.

The result at Cedar Hill High School was very different.

“Our security was cleaning the halls and checking the bathrooms,” said Cedar Hill ISD. Police Chief James Hawthorne. “And they came to a group of students in the boys’ restroom who shouldn’t have been there.”

Chief Hawthorne said his security officers spotted the group and took immediate action. “As part of their routine duties, they make sure the hall and bathroom are clean. One student called attention to security – and that’s when we discovered the boy had a gun. Is.

No one was injured. The student was arrested.

The chief said that our job is to handle the criminal aspect of these incidents. “We don’t handle the administration. Carrying a gun on campus is a third-degree crime. You are not allowed to carry firearms inside a.” School building. If convicted, he faces up to two to 10 years in prison and a fine of up to ڈالر 10,000.

If it is a student with a firearm, the expulsion will be expedited.

But Chief Hawthorne says in those cases Cedar Hill School. The system is extremely rare. “The last gun on campus came back in 2017.”

Chief Hawthorne says guns are no longer a problem on campus.

“This year, what we’re seeing is hearing from others working in the school district. Students have been out of the classroom for a year, so it’s an adjustment in the classroom, in the school setting, and so on. All things that go with it.

Tick ​​tock challenges.

One issue that is happening nationwide is the Tick tock Challenges, which students want to involve destroying school property. Chief Hawthorne says, “We’ve dealt with social media issues like any other school district. I believe 98% are just kids who do kids, so they follow the rules, respect.” But the very small two or three percent that you want to try, push where the limits are, when our response has to be quick and positive to show them the right way to act, and where the line is. ۔

He acknowledged that social media is a challenge. “All we have to do is make sure we stay on top of it, establishing the kind of relationship with the children that can alert us to what’s happening and respond quickly.”

With eight police officers and 16 security guards, Chief Hawthorne says he is fully prepared to handle any situation.

Curve change of learning from police force to school.

Chief James Hawthorne

His 28 years in the Arlington Police Force before his retirement gave him the experience that he is now back.

He retired in 2016 for three years before contacting the school system to take over the chief position.

As a former school resource officer, then promoted to assistant chief in Islington, “I had a school resource unit. I’ve had partnerships with school districts before, so it’s such a big change. No. Working for the school district, as I understand the problems in a way, was good, but it’s definitely, like any new job, a learning experience. So, there’s still a learning curve. Now I am learning its school district side and how things work differently.

One thing that is different is the epidemic, making masks important in schools. “We don’t have a mask mandate, but it is strongly recommended, and students have adjusted to it. They wear it without being reminded.

The former police chief at Cedar Hill was the man who approached Chief Hawthorne and persuaded him to step down and consider the school system. “I saw it, decided to take a leap from retirement, and never really looked back. It’s been a great journey. I’ve certainly learned a lot,” said Chief Hawthorne.

He adds, “Whether you are the police chief in a large agency or a small agency, nothing prepares you but to stay in the chair.” He says a lot of positivity has kept him employed. “And I keep learning with the work Have children You are young ”

Honors for years of community service.

In March, Elite News presented him with an award for his years of service to the community. Chief Hawthorne said he was disappointed with the award, named after Chief Don Stafford, one of the first blacks. Police officers in the Dallas Police Department.

Born and raised in Fort Worth, Chief Hawthorne attended UT-Arlington where he studied journalism. He began his professional career as a sports reporter for the Fort Worth Star Telegram after graduation. “Then I matriculated as a sports director for the radio station KNON FM 107.5 for three or four years.” He left and went to WBAP, turned from sports to news, worked there for a year before setting up the police department. He admits he enjoyed his years as a journalist, but “I had adult bills and needs and adult jobs and salaries.”

Chief Hawthorne and his wife Arsala have two older children. His daughter is an instructional coach at the local Junior High and his son A. Prosecutor in Trent County.. Both have careers in their father-like fields: education and law.

Being a positive role model.

Chief Hawthorne thinks he will stay at Cedar Hill ISD as long as he is learning and that is still a challenge. He says it is a pleasure to work with students and teachers. “It keeps me young – and busy! I love the idea of ​​learning new things – so the appeal to me is this. The police profession has evolved and changed over the years.

He now feels better working in a school environment. “It’s a challenge. But it feels like I need to stay in this position. I’m here now to impress the young people around me. As long as I can be a positive role model for these students, maybe their Some of you have to think about a law enforcement career, here I am.

“Educate-Empower-Inspire” is the slogan of Cedar Hill ISD and that’s what Chief Hawthorne seems to be doing.

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