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It is estimated that the new ban will apply to approx. 2 thousand. other companies and institutions.

Waste food collected from a waste management company Divert’s retail customers are processed in an anaerobic digestion facility in Freetown, Massachusetts. Divert processes over 232,000 tonnes of wasted food annually at its 10 plants nationwide. (Courtesy of redirection)

Massachusetts is tightening its ban on commercial food waste.

As announced by the state’s Department of Environmental Protection, any company that produces more than half a ton of food waste per week cannot send it to landfills or incinerators from November 1. previous banwhat affected enterprises producing one ton of food waste.

The ban also applies to textiles, such as household clothes and bedding, and mattresses.

Who is affected?

While the people of Massachusetts throw away large amounts of uneaten food every day, this food waste ban is not aimed at individual households.

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    Here’s what you need to know about the Textile Waste and Mattress Ban, which takes effect on November 1

New developments in food waste are affecting large-scale food waste producers such as the grocery stores, wholesalers, holiday resorts, large restaurants, and even institutions such as colleges and universities.

The state estimates that the original ban affected some 2,000 companies, and the new ban will affect about 2,000 more. According to state estimates, about half of these businesses may be restaurants, but they still account for a small fraction of restaurants.

A more stringent ban is unlikely to cause financial difficulties for restaurant owners – Industry spokesmen say the cost of managing food waste in a sustainable way is often comparable to throwing it away.

For business owners who may be concerned about whether they are banned, the government’s RecyclingWorks program has created estimation guide covering everything from hospitals to hotels.

A complete list of food waste generators is available here.

The problem with food waste

Altogether Massachusetts throws out almost million tons food waste each year that could be reduced, composted or recycled. In fact, the food makes up for it over a quarter all waste in Zatoka.

Nationally, the amount of commercial waste is approximately 16 billion tonnes per year. The United States is wasting more food than any other country in the world?approximately 30-40% of our total food supply.

This has deadly consequences for the environment – the fossil fuel emissions that are required to grow, process, and dispose of uneaten food in the United States each year are equivalent to the annual emissions of 42 coal-fired power plants. estimates from the Environmental Protection Agency.

Massachusetts aims to reduce state-wide solid waste disposal by 30% by 2030 and 90% by 2050.

But some have pointed out that the Massachusetts ban will not work if it is not enforced – according to one of them Report 2022 With MassPIRG, 40 percent of the state’s waste stream is currently made up of banned materials.

Solutions

While the new ban applies to large-scale waste, affected institutions have the option of getting rid of uneaten food.

Massachusetts has developed list statewide generators that accept food materials for composting, anaerobic digestion and other processing.

State allocates resources for large-scale compostingand made available the recycling options for food materials into organic matter over the past few years.

Anaerobic digestion, a way to turn emissions into energy, is another evolving climate solution. The pickling machines have been compared to “giant cow stomachā€¯Because it uses bacteria from the manure to eat food waste and produce methane, which is then converted into electricity.

Businesses and institutions can also dispose of unpolluted food while tackling food insecurity by making donations to local food bank.

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